Comet Assay Kits, 96-Well

Comet Assay Kits, 96-Well
  • Useful screening tool for various types of DNA damage
  • Slides are specially treated for adhesion of low-melting agarose
  • Easy visualization by epifluorescence microscopy

 

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OxiSelect™ 96-Well Comet Assay Kit
Catalog Number
STA-355
Size
96 assays
Detection
Fluorescence Microscopy
Manual/Data Sheet Download
SDS Download
Price
$335.00
OxiSelect™ 96-Well Comet Assay Kit
Catalog Number
STA-355-5
Size
5 x 96 assays
Detection
Fluorescence Microscopy
Manual/Data Sheet Download
SDS Download
Price
$1,410.00
Product Details

Our OxiSelect™ 96-Well Comet Assay Kits provide a higher-throughput way to screen for general DNA damage, regardless of the source or nature of the damage. Kits contain Comet Slides, reagents, and a fluorescent dye to visualize cells under an epifluorescence microscope.

Epifluorescence Microscopy Visualization of DNA Damage using the OxiSelect™ Comet Assay Kit. For detailed explanation please see "Calculation of Results" section in product manual.

Etoposide Treatment of Jurkat Cells. Jurkat cells untreated (left) and treated (right) with Etoposide before performing OxiSelect™ Comet Assay under alkaline electrophoresis conditions at 33V / 300 mA for 15 minutes.

Recent Product Citations
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