CMV Adenoviral Expression System

  • Engineered to produce 100- to 10,000-fold fewer wild type plaques than most other expression systems
  • Generate high-titer virus in about 2-3 weeks compared to 2-3 months with other systems
  • Cloning capacity of shuttle vector = 6.9 kb

 

Frequently Asked Questions about this product

General FAQs about using Adenovirus

General FAQs about Viral Gene Delivery

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RAPAd® CMV Adenoviral Expression System
Catalog Number
VPK-252
Size
1 kit
Detection
N/A
Manual/Data Sheet Download
SDS Download
Map Download
Sequence Download
Price
$850.00
Product Details

Making an adenovirus with traditional recombinant methods takes 2-3 months and requires tedious plaque recombination. More recent technologies have shortened this time somewhat, but still produce relatively high amounts of wild type (replication-competent) plaques, levels of which increase with serial amplification.

The RAPAd® Adenoviral Expression Systems produce recombinant adenovirus with substantially reduced wild-type virus, while considerably shortening the production time to 2-3 weeks. Serial amplification of adenovirus produced using the RAPAd® system does not significantly increase replication-competent adenovirus levels. The system uses a backbone vector from which the 5' ITR, packaging signal and E1 sequences have been removed.

Recent Product Citations
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  5. Wang, S. et al. (2015). Glycoprotein from street rabies virus BD06 induces early and robust immune responses when expressed from a non-replicative adenovirus recombinant. Arch Virol. doi:10.1007/s00705-015-2512-1.
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