Lactate Assay Kits

Lactate Assay Kits
  • Detects L-lactate in plasma, serum, urine, saliva, and lysate samples
  • Detection sensitivity of approximately 1.5 µM L-lactate
  • Lactate standard curve included
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Lactate Assay Kit (Colorimetric)
Catalog Number
MET-5012
Size
100 assays
Detection
Colorimetric
Manual/Data Sheet Download
SDS Download
Price
$365.00
Lactate Assay Kit (Fluorometric)
Catalog Number
MET-5013
Size
100 assays
Detection
Fluorometric
Manual/Data Sheet Download
SDS Download
Price
$365.00
Product Details

Lactic acid is an alpha hydroxyl acid that can ionize a carboxyl proton to yield two isomers of the lactate ion: L-lactate and D-lactate. Lactate is also formed during fermentation through the breakdown of pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase. Lactate is found in the blood at varying concentrations, dependent on the level of exercise. It is also found in the brain, where it is thought to serve as an energy source. Lactic acid is found naturally in foods such as cheese, milk, and bread.

Our Lactate Assay Kit measures L-lactate in biological samples. Lactate is first oxidized by lactate oxidase, yielding pyruvate and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide released from this reaction is specifically detected by either a colorimetric or fluorometric probe in a 1:1 ratio. Lactate levels in unknown samples are determined based on a lactate standard curve.

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  2. Rattu, G. et al. (2020). Lactate detection sensors for food, clinical and biological applications: a review. Environ Chem Lett. doi: 10.1007/s10311-020-01106-6.
  3. Lomeli, M.J.M. et al. (2020). Use of artificial illumination to reduce Pacific halibut bycatch in a U.S. West Coast groundfish Bottom trawl. Fish Res. doi: 10.1016/j.fishres.2020.105737 (#MET-5012).
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