MTT Cell Proliferation Assay

MTT Cell Proliferation Assay
  • Colorimetric format for measuring and monitoring cell proliferation
  • Kit contains sufficient reagents for the evaluation of 960 assays in 96-well plates or 192 assays in 24-well plates
  • Cell proliferation reagent can be used to detect proliferation in bacteria, yeast, fungi, protozoa as well as cultured mammalian and piscine cells
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CytoSelect™ MTT Cell Proliferation Assay
Catalog Number
CBA-252
Size
960 assays in 96-well plates
Detection
Colorimetric
Manual/Data Sheet Download
SDS Download
Price
$315.00
Product Details

Cell Biolabs’ CytoSelect™ MTT Cell Proliferation Assay provides a colorimetric format for measuring and monitoring cell proliferation.  The kit contains sufficient reagents for the evaluation of 960 assays in 96-well plates or 192 assays in 24-well plates.  Cells can be plated and then treated with compounds or agents that affect proliferation.  Cells are then detected with the proliferation reagent, which is converted in live cells from the yellow tetrazole MTT to the purple formazan form by a cellular reductase (Figure 1).  An increase in cell proliferation is accompanied by an increased signal, while a decrease in cell proliferation (and signal) can indicate the toxic effects of compounds or suboptimal culture conditions.  The assay principles are basic and can be applied to most eukaryotic cell lines, including adherent and non-adherent cells and certain tissues.  This cell proliferation reagent can be used to detect proliferation in bacteria, yeast, fungi, protozoa as well as cultured mammalian and piscine cells.

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