Traditional p24 ELISA Kit

  • Measures the p24 core protein of recombinant HIV-1 based lentivirus
  • Lentivirus quantitation is performed on a standard microplate reader
  • p24 Standard included

 

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General FAQs about Viral Gene Delivery

Video: Color Development in an ELISA

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QuickTiter™ HIV Lentivirus Quantitation Kit (HIV p24 ELISA)
Catalog Number
VPK-108-H
Size
96 assays
Detection
Colorimetric
Manual/Data Sheet Download
SDS Download
Price
$580.00
QuickTiter™ HIV Lentivirus Quantitation Kit (HIV p24 ELISA)
Catalog Number
VPK-108-H-5
Size
5 x 96 assays
Detection
Colorimetric
Manual/Data Sheet Download
SDS Download
Price
$2,515.00
Product Details

Quantitation of the HIV-1 p24 core protein of a lentiviral vector is an efficient, well-published method for determining lentivirus physical titer. The QuickTiter™ Lentivirus Quantitation Kits provide a convenient method of p24 antigen quantitation.

Quantitation of GFP Lentiviral Supernatant with the QuickTiter™ Lentivirus Quantitation Kit (HIV p24 ELISA). A GFP lentiviral construct was cotransfected with a packaging mix into 293 cells. The conditioned medium was harvested 48 hours after transfection and used to further infect 293 cells.

Quantitation of GFP Lentiviral Supernatant with the QuickTiter™ Lentivirus Quantitation Kit (HIV p24 ELISA). A GFP lentiviral construct was cotransfected with a packaging mix into 293 cells. The p24 level of the diluted lentiviral supernatant (1:10 dilution) was determined as described in the assay protocol.

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